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The 2019 Amazon Consumer Behavior Report Based on a Survey of 2,000+ U.S. Consumers 2 Introduction The retail industry has undergone a significant transformation over the past decade, largely due to the disruptive force commonly referred to as the “Amazon Effect.” By the end of 2019, Amazon is projected to see its share of the total U.S. e-commerce market reach 52.4%, up from 48% in 2018, and is responsible for more than five percent of all combined U.S. offline and online sales, according to eMarketer.1,2 Staying at the forefront of constant shifts in demographics, attitudes, and consumer preferences, as well of ongoing advancements in technology, Amazon understands the emerging expectations and needs of its customers. It is this maniacal focus on consumer experience that continues to propel Amazon forward and shape the dynamic nature of not only the platform itself, but the greater e-commerce ecosystem. By continuing its commitment to a seamless and easy-to-navigate interface, increasing access to quality brands, leveraging AI to monitor trends and enable personalized suggestions in the form of relevant organic and paid advertising, driving price value, and offering programs that set industry standards — such as Prime membership did for rapid delivery — Amazon is constantly evolving to anticipate and fulfill the needs of its customers. This poll was conducted by Zogby Analytics on behalf of Feedvisor. It was distributed online from February 14-17, 2019, among a sample of 2,000+ U.S. adults who have purchased a product on Amazon in the last 24 months. Results from the full survey have a margin of error of plus or minus 2.2 percentage points. All numbers have been rounded to the nearest percent. As a result, the challenge increases for retailers and brands who operate across the Amazon platform. Its continual expansion, dynamic nature, and growing complexity requires retailers and brands to constantly evaluate and implement new ways to differentiate themselves amidst an increasingly saturated market and ultimately deliver on the expectations of today’s connected consumers. The 2019 Amazon Consumer Behavior Report provides a detailed view into the browsing and buying habits of more than 2,000 U.S. consumers who have shopped on Amazon in the last two years. Consumers were asked about their shopping frequency and motivations, preferences across product search and purchasing, perceptions of ads and private label brands on Amazon, Prime membership status, plans for online shopping events such as Prime Day and Cyber Monday, and more. Through these compelling new insights, retailers and brands can gain a pulse on consumer behaviors, wants, and needs, and garner actionable strategies to effectively utilize Amazon to inform and generate high-value opportunities for the future. Dani Nadel President and Chief Operating Officer, Feedvisor © FEEDVISOR 3 Over 1/3 of Consumers Buy Online Weekly or More Often Over the last few years, retail culture has evolved according to the ever-increasing dominance of e-commerce. The survey revealed that more than half of consumers (58%) buy products online at least once every few weeks, with nearly one-fifth (18%) making online purchases at least a few times a week. Prime Members Are Still a Critical Audience to Reach Of the consumers who belong to Amazon Prime, Amazon’s subscription program, nearly half (48%) buy products online once a week or more frequently and nearly three-quarters (74%) shop online at least every few weeks. Additionally, more than one-third (37%) of the consumers who are not Prime members shop online just a few times a year, revealing that Prime members tend to shop more frequently than their non-Prime counterparts. How Often Consumers Buy Products Online Daily/Almost Every Day 5% A Few Times a Week Once a Week/Weekly Every Few Weeks Once a Month/Monthly Every Few Months/ Several Times a Year Rarely 4% 13% 16% 24% 17% 21% How Often Amazon Prime Members Buy Products Online Prime Members Prime Members Non-Prime Members Non-Prime Members At the end of last year, Prime membership reached an important milestone, gaining more than 100 million subscribers in the United States.1 Only 12% of Prime members buy products online several times a year or more rarely, so as Amazon continues to expand its Prime offering and associated benefits on an ongoing basis, it is likely that Prime members will continue to be highly active online consumers. Every Few Weeks Every Few Weeks Daily/Almost Every Day Daily/Almost Every Day A Few Times a Week A Few Times a Week Once a Week/Weekly Once a Week/Weekly 1Fortune Once a Month/Monthly Once a Month/Monthly Every Few Months/ Several Times a Year Every Few Months/ Several Times a Year Rarely Rarely 7% 7% 2% 2% 3% 3% 20% 20% 8% 21% 8% 21% 26% 21% 21% 26% 14% 14% 22% 22% 11% 11% 37% 37% 1% 1% 8% 8% © FEEDVISOR 4 4 © FEEDVISOR Younger Consumers Are the Most Avid Online Shoppers Although e-commerce has drastically altered how consumers of all ages research, shop for, and purchase the products they want, specific age groups have a higher propensity to buy products online. The survey revealed that Amazon consumers under 40 — particularly those aged 27-32 — buy products online much more frequently than those who are over 50. For example, 85% of consumers between age 18-32 buy products online at least a few times a week and more than one-third (37%) in that same age bracket make a purchase online daily or almost everyday. How Often Consumers Buy Products Online by Age Daily/Almost Every Day A Few Times a Week or More Often 35% 29% 28% 22% 19% 21% 10% 8% 6% 5% 8% 2% 6% 7% 1% 1% 18-21 22-26 27-32 33-40 41-49 50-59 60-69 70+ © FEEDVISOR 5 Consumer Loyalty to Amazon Is at an All-Time High Nearly half of consumers surveyed (48%) visit Amazon at least a few times a week, and a significant majority (89%) visit the platform at least once a month. Only 20% of respondents visit Amazon once a month or more rarely, revealing Amazon’s ever-increasing role in online retail culture. Amazon has become an integral part of day-to-day consumer behavior — the platform’s ease of use and customer-centric value proposition seem to be resonating now more than ever, as consumers have become reliant on it as the core destination for all stages of their purchasing journey. In the U.S. in 2018, nearly half (47%) of Internet users began their product searches on Amazon, compared to 35% who went to Google first, further driving home the notion that Amazon has deeply integrated itself into consumers’ daily lives.1 How Often Consumers Visit Amazon 29% 18% 17% 15% 9% 9% Daily/Almost Every Day A Few Times a Week Once a Week/ Weekly Every Few Weeks Once a Month/ Monthly 1eMarketer Every Few Months/Several Times a Year Consumers between ages 27-40 visit Amazon most frequently, with 65% of consumers between ages 33-40 likely to visit Amazon at least a few times a week. 2% Rarely Next, more than three-quarters (78%) of Prime members visit Amazon at least once a week, reinforcing the notion that, whether they are making a purchase or not, these consumers are regularly engaging with Amazon. © FEEDVISOR 6 Amazon Is at the Center of E-Commerce Nearly all respondents (89%) agree that they are more likely to buy products from Amazon than other e-commerce sites. “I Am More Likely to Buy Products From Amazon Than Other E-Commerce Sites” This particular point resonated with consumers who purchase online regularly — 98% of those who purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday and 99% who purchase on Amazon a few times a week agree that they are drawn to Amazon over its competitors. Demonstrating their loyalty to the platform, 96% of Prime members agree they are more likely to buy from Amazon than other e-commerce websites. When it comes to buying, nearly three-quarters (71%) of consumers make a purchase on Amazon at least once a month and only 25% of consumers make a purchase a few times a year. Younger Generations and Prime Members Are Amazon's Most Frequent Buyers With regard to both visiting and making purchases on Amazon, younger audiences have a higher tendency to do both. Consumers between ages 27-32 are the most frequent buyers on Amazon, and those over 50 purchase significantly less frequently than younger shoppers. Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree 9% Strongly Disagree 2% 54% 35% How Often Consumers Make a Purchase on Amazon 24% 25% 17% 14% 11% 5% Daily/Almost Every Day A Few Times a Week Once a Week/ Weekly Every Few Weeks Once a Month/ Every Few Monthly Months/Several Times a Year 4% Rarely Almost half (45%) of Prime members make a purchase on Amazon at least once a week, revealing how the frictionless membership program is shaping consumer behavior by functioning as a driving force behind browsing and buying on Amazon. © FEEDVISOR 7 Marketplaces Outpace Retail and Brand Websites As mentioned, an overwhelming majority of consumers are more likely to buy products from Amazon than other e-commerce sites. However, Walmart.com and eBay are the leading alternatives for consumers to buy on in addition to Amazon, revealing the uncontested dominance of marketplaces across all e-commerce channels. Other Websites Consumers Purchase On *Consumers could select all that apply Walmart.com eBay.com Retailer website (e.g. Bestbuy.com) Brand website (e.g. Nike.com) 21% 52% 43% 38% None Overstock.com Wayfair.com Other Jet.com 14% 12% 12% 8% 7% 1Digital Commerce 360 Driven and led by Amazon, marketplaces are rapidly shifting the e-commerce landscape. Last year alone, marketplaces accounted for over half of global e-commerce sales.1 Findings reveal that consumers prefer to shop on these expansive, curated destinations over brand and retailer websites. Other top responses include eBay (43%), retailer websites (38%), and brand websites (21%). Interestingly, 14% of consumers do not shop on any additional websites aside from Amazon. © FEEDVISOR 8 More Than Half of Consumers Are Amazon Prime Members Amazon Prime — the company's $119 annual membership program that boasts free, two-day shipping, video and music streaming, exclusive, in-store deals at Whole Foods, free audiobooks and magazines, and access to specific brands and deals — remains on a fast track for growth. More than half of the survey respondents (55%) are currently Prime members. This information reinforces eMarketer’s prediction that 51% of U.S. households will be Prime members by year-end, an increase of 5.2 million households over last year.1 By continuing to roll out new offerings such as Amazon Day where Prime members can choose a specific day of the week to receive their deliveries, the company is increasing adoption for its loyalty program that is grounded in convenience.2 Of the Prime members surveyed, more than two-thirds (67%) are a parent or guardian of a child under 17 who is living at home. Additionally, those respondents with household incomes over $150K are significantly more likely to be Prime members than those with incomes under $25K. Consumers' Relationship With Amazon Prime 31% 15% 55% Current Prime Member Previous Prime Member Not a Prime Member 1eMarketer 2Amazon Prime Members Are More Loyal, Higher-Value Consumers Next, of the consumers who buy products online daily or almost everyday, nearly four-fifths of them (79%) are current Prime members and of those who buy online a few times a week, 89% of them are Prime members. Even further, of those who make a purchase on Amazon specifically daily or almost everyday, a staggering 89% of them are Prime members and of those who buy on Amazon a few times a week, 87% of them are Prime members. Nearly half (45%) of current Prime members make a purchase on Amazon at least once a week. All of this data demonstrates that Prime members are frequent online buyers, habitually taking advantage of the benefits offered to them through the program. How Often Prime Members Make a Purchase on Amazon Daily/Almost Every Day 9% A Few Times a Week Once a Week/Weekly Every Few Weeks Once a Month/Monthly Every Few Months/ Several Times a Year 18% 19% 28% 14% 13% © FEEDVISOR 9 Free Two-Day Shipping Is the Flagship Benefit of Amazon Prime Of the respondents who answered they are Prime members, a majority (83%) cited free two-day shipping as the most compelling benefit of Prime membership. It was the most popular response for all age brackets, revealing that being able to conveniently order and receive fast and free delivery on over 100 million items transcends generations. Consumers’ Favorite Prime Benefit Free Two-Day Shipping 83% Video and Music Streaming 10% Prime-Exclusive Deals at Whole Foods 5% Free Audiobooks and Magazines Other 1% 1% For those consumers who are Prime members, an overwhelming number of respondents (95%) are likely to keep their Amazon Prime membership. Of those who are not Prime members, more than a quarter (26%) are likely to join in the future. When asked about the main reason that they are not a Prime member already, the top response across all age brackets except 70+ was that membership is too expensive. Consumers also cited that they do not shop on Amazon enough for it to be valuable (46%) and shipping time is not important to them (26%) as reasons that they do not subscribe to Prime. With regard to joining Amazon Prime in the future, 58% of non-Prime members who make a purchase online daily or almost daily are very likely to and 66% of respondents who make a purchase on Amazon daily or almost daily are likely to, revealing the consumers who currently do not subscribe to Prime are open to testing it out. Prime Members’ Likelihood to Keep Their Membership Very Likely Somewhat Likely Somewhat Unlikely Very Unlikely Unsure 2% 2% 2% 19% 76% For those consumers who were formerly Prime members, over half (55%) are likely to rejoin the membership program in the future, as Amazon continues to roll out exclusive benefits and deals to Prime users. © FEEDVISOR 10 Prime Eligibility Informs Purchase Decisions for Majority of Consumers More than two-thirds (67%) of consumers cited Prime eligibility as an important factor when they are selecting a product on Amazon, meaning that a majority of consumers filter specifically for Prime items when shopping on the platform. Of the Prime members surveyed, 75% search specifically for Prime- eligible items. Shoppers under the age of 60 are approximately 20 percentage points more likely to specifically search for Prime- eligible products versus shoppers over 60, especially those age 27-32. Taking that one step further, of the current Prime members: - More than one-third (34%) always purchase Prime-eligible products. - Over half (53%) frequently buy Prime-eligible products. By ordering Prime-specific items, consumers can receive their entire order within two days. If only some items in a purchase are Prime-eligible, the consumers will be charged applicable shipping fees for the ineligible items, so they are likely proactively avoiding that. © FEEDVISOR 11 While Mobile Is Growing, Desktop Is Still Dominant for Purchases Despite the increased penetration of mobile commerce, the majority (65%) of consumers use a computer to buy products most frequently, followed by over a quarter (26%) who use a smartphone. Prime members are more likely to use a desktop than a smartphone to buy products most frequently, with 62% of current Prime members shopping via a computer and 27% utilizing a smartphone. For those consumers who purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday, more than half (58%) of them buy on a computer and 36% purchase on a smartphone. Additionally, Amazon shoppers over 40 are significantly more likely to use a desktop over a smartphone to make a purchase, and those between ages 18-21 are the most apt to buy from their smartphone. Although an increasing amount of traffic for online shopping derives from mobile devices, a significant number of users are still inclined to make their purchases via a desktop, sellers and brands have a responsibility to create a shopping experience that appeals to consumers regardless of the device the traffic comes from. Which Device Consumers Use to Buy Products Most Frequently 1% 1% 9% 26% 65% Computer Smartphone Tablet Voice Assistant Other 62% 73% Prime Members Non-Prime Members 27% 19% 10% 7% Computer Smartphone Tablet Voice Assistant Other 1% 0% 0% 1% © FEEDVISOR 12 Younger Consumers and Prime Members Are More Likely to Own Voice-Activated Devices When asked if they own an Amazon Alexa, Google Home, or other voice- activated device (VAD), 64% responded that they do not, while 36% do. Consumers Who Own a Voice-Activated Device 36% 64% Yes No Younger Amazon consumers — particularly those between ages 18-21 — are more likely to own a VAD than older consumers, and those with higher incomes are more likely to own one but not likely to have used it for shopping. Only 23% of those who make less than $25K per year own a VAD, while 50% of those who make more than $150K own one. Moreover, 51% of current Prime members own a voice-activated device. Additionally, frequent online buyers are more likely to own a VAD — of those who buy products online daily or almost everyday, 77% own a VAD and of those who purchase on Amazon daily or almost daily, 80% own a VAD. 1eMarketer The technology, which is becoming increasingly mainstream, allows for convenience and ease of use for shoppers. eMarketer predicts that by the end of 2019, there will be nearly 23 million U.S. voice-activated device buyers, so sellers and brands on Amazon can work to adapt product detail page content to voice search in order to capitalize on the growing trend of voice commerce.1 © FEEDVISOR 13 Consumers Are Open to Experimenting With Voice Technology for Shopping Of the total consumers surveyed, 40% have used a VAD to order a a product. Younger audiences, including 58% of those between 27- 32, are more likely to have used a VAD to order a product than older shoppers. Of the consumers who do not have a voice-activated device, 29% are likely to purchase one in the future. Even further, nearly half (46%) of Prime members have used a voice- activated device to purchase a product and over one-third of Prime members (36%) are likely to get a VAD in the future. Consumers can decide to use an Amazon Alexa, for example, to place orders for Prime-eligible products from their order history. If the item is available, the Alexa will reveal the item name and price and consumers can receive additional product details in the Alexa app. Although 60% of consumers that have a voice-activated device have never used it to order a product, more than two-thirds (67%) would consider using it to voice order a product in the future, indicative of consumers’ growing adoption of the innovative technology. Of those who make a purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday, a strong majority (86%) of them have used their VAD to make a purchase on Amazon and nearly half (46%) of Prime members have done the same. Consumers Who Have Used Their Voice-Activated Device to Order a Product 33% 40% 67% 60% No Yes Consumers Who Would Consider Using Their Voice-Activated Device for Ordering 33% 67% Yes No Consumer Likelihood to Get a Voice-Activated Device in the Future Very Likely Somewhat Likely Somewhat Unlikely Very Unlikely Unsure 8% 21% 19% 14% 38% © FEEDVISOR 1414 Amazon Is Indispensable Throughout the User Journey Consumers are leveraging Amazon throughout various stages of their buying journeys, from searching to checking prices and scanning product reviews through to conversion. Two-thirds of respondents (66%) typically start their search for new products on Amazon, and one-fifth (20%) start on a search engine such as Google. When consumers are ready to buy a specific product, nearly three-fourths (74%) go to Amazon. The second most popular response was a search engine like Google (10%). Nearly three-quarters (73%) of Prime members start their search for new products on Amazon and over 80% of Prime members go to Amazon when they are ready to buy a specific product, once again revealing strong member loyalty to the program. Additionally, 79% of consumers who make a purchase on Amazon daily or almost daily go straight to Amazon to buy a product. This information indicates that when consumers have a positive customer experience, they are likely to return for future purchases. Where Consumers Start Their Search for New Products 4% 3% 1% 1% 4% 20% 66% Amazon Search Engine Brand Website Retailer Website Another Marketplace Social Media Other Where Consumers Go When They Are Ready to Buy a Specific Product 3% 1% 4% 4% 5% 10% Amazon Search Engine Brand Website Retailer Website 74% Another Marketplace Other Social Media © FEEDVISOR© FEEDVISOR When it comes to checking prices prior to making a purchase, 82% of respondents go to Amazon. More than one-third (36%) go to a search engine like Google and 33% go to a retailer website such as bestbuy.com. To check product reviews, more than three- fourths (79%) of respondents go to Amazon, while nearly one-third (32%) go to a search engine like Google and 25% go to a retailer website. A significant majority of consumers who shop on Amazon daily (82%) check product reviews on Amazon before making a purchase. 15 Where Consumers Check Prices Before Making a Purchase *Consumers could select all that apply 82% Amazon Search Engine Retailer Website Brand Website 36% 33% 24% Another Marketplace 17% Social Media Other 5% 3% Where Consumers Check Reviews Before Making a Purchase *Consumers could select all that apply 79% Amazon Search Engine Retailer Website Brand Website Another Marketplace 11% Social Media Other 7% 4% 32% 25% 20% To make sure you are pricing optimally, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect © FEEDVISOR 16 Nearly Half of Consumers Are Not Going Past the Second Page of Search Results When searching for a product to buy on Amazon, 44% of consumers scroll through two pages or less of search results and more than a quarter (26%) frequently buy the first product listed on an Amazon search results page. Interestingly, only 21% of consumers rarely or never buy the first product listed on an Amazon search results page, revealing the importance for sellers and brands to gain that top-ranked position, as it often leads to consumer conversion. Average Number of Pages Consumers Scroll Through When Searching for Products on Amazon 1 Page 2 Pages 3 Pages 4 Pages 5+ Pages 12% 8% 26% 22% For those who buy products on Amazon daily or almost everyday, more than half (54%) always buy the first product listed on Amazon’s search engine results page (SERP). For a content listing optimization analysis, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect Additionally, younger consumers — particularly those between 18-21 years old — are more likely to always buy the first product listed on an Amazon SERP. As Amazon solidifies its position as the main search engine for product discovery, sellers and brands need to take proactive measures to ensure product positioning on pages one and two. Amazon’s Search Engine Caters to Consumers An overwhelming majority of consumers (95%) are satisfied with the results they get when searching for products on Amazon. Even further, 71% of consumers who shop on Amazon daily or almost daily are highly satisfied with their search results. Amazon offers consumers options to help make this process as seamless as possible, allowing them to sort search by price, new arrivals, customer reviews, featured items, or product category. 33% Consumer Satisfaction With Product Search Results on Amazon 1% 1% 2% Highly Satisfied Satisfied 45% 50% Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Unsure © FEEDVISOR 17 Price Remains the Most Significant Factor of Purchase Influence On Amazon, price drives consumer buying decisions. For over four- fifths of respondents (82%), price is a very important factor when selecting a product. For Prime members, price is critical to product selection — 82% cited it as a very important factor that informs their selection process. Price tends to be even more important for the low-income Amazon shoppers: 91% of those making less than $25K view it as very important and 87% of those making $25-35K agree. Additionally, factors such as Prime eligibility and brand name matter more to younger respondents than older ones. Factors That Influence Consumer Product Selection *Consumers indicated these factors were "Very Important" Price Low Shipping Cost Positive Product Reviews Flexible Return Policy Fast Shipping Time Prime Eligibility Brand Name 82% 70% 57% 49% 47% 35% 27% For an analysis and consultation of your Amazon store, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect © FEEDVISOR 1818 Product Descriptions and Reviews Drive Consideration and Purchase Decisions A large majority of consumers (82%) read the full product descriptions before making a purchase on Amazon. For sellers and brands, having clear, SEO-rich product descriptions will not only help search rank, but including easy-to-understand details and concise copy about value-added benefits and features will help inform consumers’ buying decisions. When it comes to product reviews, 77% of consumers read them to some degree before making a purchase — 41% always do and 36% frequently or often do so. Frequency of Reading Full Product Descriptions Prior to Making a Purchase on Amazon Always Frequently/Often Sometimes/Occasionally 15% Rarely Never 2% 1% A strong majority (92%) of consumers agree that they trust the reviews on Amazon product listings. Monitoring product reviews can help sellers and brands on Amazon stay apprised of consumer trends, potential product improvements, and more. They are also a key aspect to effectively managing seller reputation and can help with SKU- specific analysis and benchmarking against the competition. Frequency of Reading Product Reviews Prior to Making a Purchase on Amazon Always Frequently/Often Sometimes/Occasionally 17% Rarely Never 4% 2% 44% 38% 41% 36% © FEEDVISOR© FEEDVISOR 19 43% of Consumers Click on Amazon Ads From the Web; Google Is the Top Referrer More than two-fifths (43%) of consumers have clicked on an advertisement that linked to an Amazon product when browsing the web. Younger consumers are more likely to click on an Amazon ad across the web, as 58% of those between 18-21 have done so. Of those respondents who clicked on an Amazon product ad on the web, over three-quarters (76%) cited Google as the top source of the ad, followed by Facebook (49%). Younger, More Frequent Shoppers Are More Likely to Buy the Item Featured in the Ad For the consumers who clicked on an ad that linked to an Amazon product, more than one-third (37%) went on to purchase the item featured in the advertisement. Younger respondents — specifically those between 18-21 — are particularly likely to purchase the item featured in the ad. Channels Where Consumers Have Clicked on an Ad That Linked to an Amazon Product *Consumers could select all that apply 76% 49% Google Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest Snapchat Other 21% 14% 12% 7% 5% Of the consumers who shop online daily or almost daily, 73% have clicked on an Amazon product ad while browsing the web, and 83% of them purchased the product, demonstrating that with a higher shopping frequency, consumers are more likely to allow ads to inform their purchasing decisions. More than half of consumers (51%) who have clicked on an Amazon product ad while browsing the web are Prime members and 43% of Prime members who clicked on an Amazon ad on the web ultimately went on to purchase. Consumers Who Clicked on an Amazon Ad From the Web and Went on to Purchase the Item To accelerate your Amazon Advertising strategy and increase discovery, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect 24% 37% 40% Yes No Unsure © FEEDVISOR 20 On Amazon, Over 1/3 of Consumers Have Clicked on a Product Ad When shopping on Amazon, 35% of respondents have clicked on a product advertisement. Younger shoppers are more likely to have done so versus older shoppers, particularly those over 40. Of those between ages 18-21, more than half (57%) have clicked on an product advertisement when browsing for products on the platform. When looking at how Prime membership impacts consumer likelihood to click on an ad, 40% of current Prime members have clicked a product advertisement while browsing on Amazon. Consumers Who Clicked on a Product Ad When Browsing on Amazon 35% 35% 17% 17% 49% 49% Yes Yes No No Unsure Unsure For end-to-end ad optimization that lowers ACoS and drives velocity, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect © FEEDVISOR 21 Amazon Ads Resonate Differently for High-Value Segments When asked how they feel about advertisements on Amazon, there was not one overwhelmingly popular response. However, this may be because Amazon’s most popular type of pay-per-click advertisement — Sponsored Products — usually blend into the content of the page, so consumers may not even be aware they are clicking on an ad. Nearly one-third (31%) of consumers rarely notice the ads, a quarter find them distracting, and 21% find them to be helpful. Interestingly, only 6% of consumers do not trust Amazon’s ads. Amazon has worked diligently to become one of the most trusted retail institutions to ever exist, and they extend that commitment through all aspects of their business, including their dedication to advertising and optimizing the consumer experience. For those consumers who buy products online daily or almost everyday, 60% find the ads to be helpful. How Consumers Feel About Ads on Amazon I Rarely Notice Them They Are Distracting They Are Helpful They Are Aligned With My Shopping Habits I Do Not Trust Them 31% 25% 21% 18% 6% For an analysis of your Amazon Advertising strategy, get in touch with us at feedvisor.com/connect For those who purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday, 69% find them to be helpful, revealing that those who are shopping and converting more regularly are likely more familiar with how to identify the ads and understand how to utilize them to their advantage. © FEEDVISOR 22 Amazon’s Personalization Engine Drives Add-On Purchases Nearly half of consumers (45%) always or frequently notice other product suggestions on an Amazon product detail page. Next, more than one-third (36%) selected "Items Other Customers Buy After Viewing That Item." By integrating product suggestions throughout the buying process — from product discovery to checkout — Amazon is inserting personalization and increasing engagement and stickiness with consumers. Younger shoppers, particularly those between 18-21 years old, are more likely to notice these product suggestions. Of the consumers between 18-21 years old, nearly one-third (32%) always notice these product suggestions and 69% always or frequently notice them. Even further, more than half (58%) of those who make a purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday always notice these product suggestions. With regard to the the type of product suggestion that consumers have clicked on, Amazon’s “Frequently Bought Together” feature is the most popular — nearly half (48%) of consumers have clicked on this specific type of ad from a product detail page. The upsell feature, which is automated by Amazon based on the browsing and purchasing habits of consumers, entices customers to add incremental items to their order. How Often Consumers Notice Other Product Suggestions on an Amazon Product Page Sometimes/Occasionally Frequently/Often Always Rarely Never 16% 15% 2% 38% 29% Types of Suggested Items Consumers Have Clicked on From an Amazon Product Page *Consumers could select all that apply Frequently Bought Together Items Other Customers Buy After Viewing That Item Items Other Customers Also Shopped For Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations Sponsored Products Related to That Item Unsure 48% 36% 29% 29% 26% 19% © FEEDVISOR 23 Consumers Actively Seek Brands They Know on Amazon For those consumers who buy on Amazon daily, all of them (100%) at least occasionally go to Amazon in search of products from specific brands, demonstrating that consumers are loyal to brands that provide what they are looking for in a convenient, seamless shopping experience. Nearly three-quarters (74%) of consumers cited brand name as an important factor when selecting a product, and 59% of daily Amazon shoppers cited brand name as a very important factor when selecting a product. Interestingly, only 41% of consumers strongly agree that they are satisfied with the number of brands they know on Amazon. Amazon's commitment to diversifying its product selection is twofold — its solicitation of known brands to sell on the platform and of brand manufacturers interested in selling items that will be exclusively sold on Amazon.1 Both initiatives signify Amazon's push to expand its brand offering, while simultaneously incentivizing brands to partner with the company. Consumers Are Satisfied With the Number of Brands They Know on Amazon Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree 6% Strongly Disagree 3% 41% 50% 1The Wall Street Journal © FEEDVISOR 24 Consumers Are Satisfied With Amazon's Private Label Brands When asked if they know that Amazon has its own brands, three- fifths (61%) responded that they do. Even further, the more frequently consumers buy products online, the more they are aware that Amazon has its own brands. For example, 86% of the customers who buy products online daily or almost daily know that Amazon has its own brands, while only 39% of those who buy products online every few months are aware. Do Consumers Know That Amazon Has Its Own Brands? 14% 14% 25% 25% 61% 61% Yes Yes No No Unsure Unsure Customer Satisfaction With the Quality of Amazon Brand Products 1% 1% 42% 42% 57% 57% Highly Satisfied Highly Satisfied Satisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Of the consumers who responded that they know Amazon has its own brands, 60% have purchased a product from an Amazon brand, and nearly all (99%) are satisfied with the quality of Amazon brand products they purchased. Additionally, 58% of current Prime members are highly satisfied with the quality of Amazon brand products they order, which is an important factor in their buying experiences as loyal shoppers. © FEEDVISOR 25 Awareness of Amazon's Private Labels Is Growing For Those Aware, Price Is the Primary Driver For Those Unaware, There Is Openness to Experimenting Consumers are becoming increasingly aware of Amazon’s private label brands and are tempted to try them because of price. Of the consumers who are aware of the brands and have purchased one, their motivation for choosing that brand was predominantly price, with more than three-fifths (62%) citing this response. The second most popular response was product quality, with nearly a quarter of respondents choosing that as their primary motivator for buying a product from an Amazon brand. When customers who were unaware or unsure of Amazon brands were asked if they would be interesting in trying a product from one of them, 62% said they would be. Only 8% have no interest in trying one of these products. Creating their own collection of brands is undoubtedly a priority for Amazon. The platform’s brands — known as “Our Brands” — denotes either an Amazon private label brand or is an item from a curated selection of brands exclusively sold on Amazon.1 Consumer Motivation for Choosing an Amazon Brand Price Quality Reviews Other 2% Shipping 1% 23% 12% 62% Since launching its first in-house brand in the early 2000s, Amazon has expanded its collection of private labels to include more than 125 brand names and its focus on continuing the growth of the collection demonstrates their commitment to diversifying their product selection and driving incremental growth to their retail arm.2 Consumer Interest in Trying a Product From an Amazon Brand 30% 8% 62% Yes No Unsure 1Amazon 2CNN © FEEDVISOR 26 Counterfeit Products Are a Growing Concern Younger, More Frequent Shoppers Are More Concerned With Buying Counterfeits Younger consumers are more concerned about counterfeit products than older Amazon consumers. For example, 36% of consumers between 18-21 strongly agree that they are concerned about buying counterfeits, while only 10% of those between 60-69 strongly agree. For the consumers who make a purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday, more than three-fifths (62%) strongly agree that they are concerned with buying counterfeits. Over the last year, there has been ongoing dialogue about the concern of counterfeit products in the market. When asked if they are concerned about counterfeit products on Amazon, consumers were nearly split in their response — 48% agree they are while 52% disagree. However, mitigating issues surrounding counterfeit goods has been a focus for Amazon in their pursuit of driving counterfeits to zero on the platform. Their new initiative, Project Zero, utilizes technology and machine-learning to help detect counterfeits of brands’ products. Through automated protections that scan Amazon stores and proactively remove suspected counterfeits and a self-service counterfeit removal tool for brands to product serialization and reinforcement of their Brand Registry, Amazon is providing brands with tools to help monitor for fraudulent listings.1 Consumers Are Concerned With Buying Counterfeit Products on Amazon Strongly Agree Somewhat Agree Somewhat Disagree Strongly Disagree 1Amazon 18% 16% 31% 36% © FEEDVISOR 27 Holiday Events Shift Buying Behavior Although 43% of respondents have not purchased anything during an online shopping event such as Prime Day, Black Friday, or Cyber Monday, the latter was the event that most consumers have participated in by buying a product (36%). This aligns with the fact that Cyber Monday 2018 was Amazon’s biggest selling day in the company’s history.1 Younger Amazon shoppers, particularly those under 40, are more likely to have taken advantage of these online events. For Prime Day and Black Friday, the age range where the most consumers have made a purchase is 18-21 and for Cyber Monday, those age 33-40 have participated most frequently. Interestingly, nearly half of current Prime members (47%) have made a purchase during Prime Day. Deals and Discounts Drive Purchases During Online Events Of the consumers who have made a purchase during any of the aforementioned online events, a majority (70%) said the events have influenced their buying patterns through deals and discounts. During last year’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday, for example, Amazon launched free shipping on all U.S. holiday orders, released its first- ever printed holiday shopping catalog, and rolled out pre-holiday deals and promotions starting as early as November 1.2,3 How These Online Events Have Influenced Consumers’ Buying Patterns *Consumers could select all that apply I Shop During These Events for the Deals and Discounts I Wait to Make a Big Purchase Until One of These Events I Prefer to Shop Online Vs. Brick-and-Mortar Unsure 32% 25% 4% 71% This year, consumers are already anticipating making a purchase during a holiday event: 41% for Black Friday, 40% for Cyber Monday, and 31% for Prime Day. Younger audiences, particularly those under 40, are more likely to take advantage of these events this year. Nearly half (48%) of current Prime members plan to make a purchase during this year’s Prime Day. For those who purchase on Amazon daily or almost everyday, nearly three-fourths (74%) plan to make a purchase on Prime Day, 58% on Black Friday, and 44% on Cyber Monday. 1MarketWatch 2Amazon 3CNBC © FEEDVISOR 28 Amazon Is the Most Popular Destination for Last-Minute Holiday Gifts When asked where they shop most frequently for last-minute holiday gifts, 60% of consumers cited Amazon. The platform typically runs year-end deals where consumers can capitalize on holiday clearance, overstocks, and steep price markdowns. Where Consumers Shop Most Frequently for Last-Minute Holiday Gifts Amazon Other 60% 16% Nearly three-quarters (72%) of consumers who buy on Amazon daily or almost daily shop on the platform most frequently for last-minute holiday gifts, affirming their familiarity with the website and its holiday-specific discounts and promotions, as well as demonstrating the appeal of free two-day shipping. Retailer Website (e.g. bestbuy.com) Search Engine (like Google) Brand Website (e.g. nike.com) Another marketplace (e.g. eBay) 8% 6% 5% 4% Social Media (e.g. Facebook) 1% Moreover, Amazon was the top response for each income bracket, as well as each age bracket except for 70+, where the top response was “Other.” For those that chose “Other,” responses consumers specified included malls and other brick-and-mortar stores. During the five days from Thanksgiving to Cyber Monday last year, consumers ordered more than 180 million items on Amazon. Sellers and brands can capitalize on these key moments in time — as well as the time from mid-December through year-end — to capitalize on holiday sales and carry momentum into Q1. © FEEDVISOR 29 Amazon's Growing Product Selection Drives Broader Demand Overall, the Amazon product categories that are purchased most frequently are Electronics (44%), Clothing, Shoes & Jewelry (43%), Home & Kitchen (39%), and Beauty & Personal Care (36%). These same top four categories apply for current Prime members. For those between ages 18-26, Cell Phones & Accessories is the most popular product category on Amazon. For those who shop online daily, the most popular product category is Beauty & Personal Care. Products Consumers Buy on Amazon Most Frequently *Consumers could select all that apply Electronics Clothing, Shoes & Jewelry Home & Kitchen Beauty & Personal Care Books Cell Phones & Accessories Movies & TV Pet Supplies Sports & Outdoors Grocery & Gourmet Food Automotive Parts & Accessories Other Baby 44% 43% 39% 36% 33% 28% 25% 20% 17% 15% 13% 9% 9% The diversity and strength of Amazon’s product selection is evident through these results, as the company is constantly working to increase product and category coverage on their platform and customers are likely making purchases across a variety of categories. © FEEDVISOR 30 As Amazon Experiences Become More Accessible, Consumers Are More Open to Exploring Them The expansion of Amazon's geographical footprint through physical storefronts — such as Amazon Go stores, Amazon 4-Star, and more than 450 Whole Foods locations — demonstrates the company's commitment to solidifying an online and offline connection with both prospects and repeat customers. Given that these brick-and-mortar locations drive brand awareness and act as an additional touchpoint for engagement, Amazon is likely to continue opening more of them. While most of these programs are only available in certain areas or test markets, as they become more widespread, consumers are more inclined to experiment with them. While more than half of the survey respondents are currently Amazon Prime members (55%), relatively few have tried Amazon experiences such as Prime Pantry, AmazonFresh, or Amazon Go. Of the current Prime members surveyed, 31% used Prime Pantry (their top response) in the past year. Amazon Experiences Consumers Have Used in the Past Year *Consumers could select all that apply None None Prime Pantry Prime Pantry AmazonFresh AmazonFresh Amazon Go Amazon Go Amazon Locker Amazon Locker Amazon Flex Amazon Flex 19% 19% 13% 13% 12% 12% 10% 10% 9% 9% Other Other 6% 6% Hub by Amazon Hub by Amazon 5% 5% 1Bloomberg However, when asked if they are likely to visit an Amazon Go store in the future, two-fifths (40%) cited that they would. Younger respondents are more likely to do so, with 29% of those between 18-21 citing that they are very likely to visit an Amazon Go location. Slated to open up to 3,000 of the cashierless stores by 2021, Amazon utilizes AI technology to monitor items as if they were sitting in a virtual cart.1 When consumers finish their shopping, they can just leave the store. Amazon’s technology allows them to track what customers bought, what they picked up and put back down, and in what order they handled different items — providing them with compelling data to determine which factors influence shopping decisions. Consumer Likelihood to Visit an Amazon Go Store in the Future 45% 45% Very Likely Somewhat Likely Somewhat Unlikely Very Unlikely Unsure 16% 24% 13% 13% 34% © FEEDVISOR 31 Younger Consumers Are More Likely to Buy Groceries on Amazon Although more than half (53%) of respondents never buy groceries on Amazon, 15% always or frequently do and 13% sometimes or occasionally do. Consumers can buy groceries directly on Amazon from the Grocery & Gourmet Food section, or through programs such as Prime Pantry or AmazonFresh. Younger Amazon consumers are more likely to buy groceries through the platform than their older counterparts — 36% of those between the ages 18-21 always or frequently buy their groceries through Amazon. Amazon's Purchase of Whole Foods Has Shifted Consumer Behavior of Younger Audiences A quarter of respondents agree that since Amazon acquired Whole Foods, they shop at the upscale grocer more often. Younger Amazon consumers — particularly those under 32 — are more likely to do so. Half of the consumers between ages 22-26 agree that since Amazon acquired Whole Foods, they shop there more often. Since Amazon Acquired Whole Foods, Consumers Shop There More Often Strongly Agree Strongly Agree 10% 10% Somewhat Agree Somewhat Agree 15% 15% Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Disagree 22% 22% How Often Consumers Buy Groceries on Amazon by Age Strongly Disagree Strongly Disagree 54% 54% Always Frequently/Often Sometimes/Occasionally 18-21 22-26 27-32 33-40 41-49 50-59 60-69 70+ As an added value for Prime members and a means to draw them in, Whole Foods offers exclusive in-store deals at the grocery locations, such as an extra 10% off sale items, weekly member deals, and 5% back when shopping with the Prime Rewards Visa Card. Amazon’s foray into the grocery sector has not gone unnoticed. Online grocery sales are predicted to make up 20% of the overall U.S. grocery market by 2025. As in other categories, Amazon is an undisputed leader in the space, with an estimated 18% share of the online grocery market.1 Amazon is focused on building out a robust physical grocery presence, getting in front of current and potential customers wherever they are. 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1Forbes © FEEDVISOR 32 Looking Ahead This report aims to provide a window into the behaviors, wants, and needs of today’s consumers and their experiences with and expectations of Amazon as an integral component of their broader shopping mindset. It is a comprehensive resource to help retailers and brands understand and effectively connect with high-value prospects and loyal, repeat consumers on Amazon. The findings reinforce that Amazon is extending its reach to dominate all stages of the consumer purchase journey. With 66% of consumers stating they begin their product search on Amazon and 89% more likely to purchase products from Amazon over other e-commerce sites, Amazon is encroaching on Google’s position, as well as on retailers’ and brands’ websites. For retailers and brands, a critical part of demand generation on the platform is product advertising — both within the Amazon marketplace and across Amazon’s programmatic DSP network. This becomes increasingly important as nearly half of consumers (44%) are not generally going past the second page of search results. This is complimented by consumers actively seeking and expecting to find the brands...

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